“This was a terrible mistake.”

The Associated Press has reported that the AP News Agency was paid by a former Trump adviser to influence the news coverage of the president’s inauguration.

AP was asked to pay $500,000 for an opinion piece, but declined to pay it.

It was unclear what the AP story was about, though the Washington Post reported it was about the president who signed the executive order.

The AP News Service said it was not paid to produce an opinion article about Trump.

The president’s former adviser, Peter Schweizer, was named by the AP as an executive producer on the story.

The news agency’s owner, News Corp., said in a statement that “it was our policy not to comment on internal personnel matters.”

The AP did not immediately respond to a request for comment from the Associated Press.

A Reuters story said the story was commissioned by a group of news organizations that include The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and CNN.

“We are committed to an independent journalism that is fearless, objective, and that brings people together across all platforms to offer informed and credible coverage of global affairs,” the AP said in its statement.

The news service’s news director, David Cote, was fired in May after The New Yorker reported that Schweizer had helped organize the AP in an effort to sway coverage of Trump’s inauguration, and had tried to influence stories about the new administration. “

In the future, we will work to ensure AP does not engage in any further activities that might benefit from a paid opinion piece.”

The news service’s news director, David Cote, was fired in May after The New Yorker reported that Schweizer had helped organize the AP in an effort to sway coverage of Trump’s inauguration, and had tried to influence stories about the new administration.

In a statement, the AP also said it “has never been paid by the president or any White House official” and that it had “a policy of not commenting on internal matters.”

Schweizer did not respond to messages seeking comment from The Associated News.

The New Hampshire-based AP said it would not comment on the matter.

The Associated General Counsel’s office, which oversees AP’s editorial standards, did not return requests for comment.

The organization’s news division was one of several to be investigated in May for its handling of the White House press briefing.

It had not been involved in any internal investigations into the AP, according to a spokesperson.

The White House did not comment to The Washington Examiner on Schweizer’s relationship with the AP.

The former AP News Corp. executive has been named in multiple lawsuits against the organization.

In March, a federal judge in Los Angeles ordered the AP to pay nearly $4.5 million to a former AP news producer who had worked for Schweizer.

The judge ordered the payments be made “with the goal of compensating Mr. Schweizer for the harm he suffered as a result of his unlawful conduct.”

The judge also said the AP was “unable to prove” that it was “intentionally defamed or harmed” by the producer.

The court ordered the money be paid out in full, saying the AP “further demonstrated that it knew the allegations were false.”

Schweizers lawyer, William Kucinich, said he was unaware of any lawsuit against the AP by the former AP employee.

He said that “any attempt to discredit or damage the reputation of the organization or its journalists would be an abuse of judicial process.”

The former employee who filed the lawsuit in May said the accusations were part of a concerted effort by Schweizer to undermine the reputation and credibility of the news organization.

The suit, which was not referred to by name, seeks to compel the AP and AP News to pay the plaintiff damages, punitive damages and attorneys’ fees.

In addition, it seeks a declaration that “no official of the Department of Justice, including AP, is acting as an agent of the President of the United States, with the sole purpose of obtaining or maintaining access to records or materials in a manner inconsistent with the laws of the State of New York.”

The suit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New Mexico.

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